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Chatroom robot sex

Slack, first released in 2013, has essentially ushered employer-sanctioned social media into the workplace.

“As far as I know, nobody lost their job over it,” Laura says.

You can drop in and out of chat channels as the day goes on, or, if you’re a member of a particularly active channel, you might spend all day there, reading through the scroll.

Channels are sometimes devoted to hobbies or snacks, but the overall idea is to improve workplace collaboration and communication.

And, “people were getting called ‘dumb sluts’ left and right.” At first, as salespeople started reading, the talk continued, but then the account managers noticed who was joining and began to flee.

The fight-or-flight impulse was not particularly useful here: They could make the channel disappear from their own view of Slack, but running away did nothing to delete its history.

The Slack sell to employers is that it decreases the burden of email, because nobody likes email.

(Whether infinite chatty one-line messages are preferable to an overflowing inbox is debatable; for now, though, Slack retains the advantage of novelty.) It integrates the tools you already use, like Google Drive, so you can easily centralize everything.

Love Palz products were originally geared toward people in long-distance relationships, but the new social platform will allow members to connect with all kinds of other people for stranger-assisted robot sex.