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Faulty fossil dating

This suggested the creation was conceivably older than the 6,000-year timeframe proposed by Ussher and Lightfoot. In fact, some genealogies include names that are left out by other genealogies in Scripture itself.” As evidence the genealogies are telescoped (compressed or abbreviated), scholars point to examples such as the genealogy of Moses, which appears four separate times in Scripture (Exodus -20, Numbers -59, 1 Chronicles 6:1-3, 23:6-13).

Proponents of OEC believe the Bible is the inspired, infallible, inerrant Word of God and believe the Genesis creation account to be historical narrative—not myth, allegory, legend or poetic expression.

While it is commonly thought that evening/morning represents a “day,” Collins says “Logically, this is nonsense [since] a day must describe 24 hours or at least a period of daylight.” He further states “and there was evening, and there was morning” brackets the night and marks the end points of each workday of God.

Furthermore, the seventh day lacks the concluding refrain, “and there was evening and there was morning,” suggesting a non-ending day.

Those who hold that the genealogies are telescoped place the creation of Adam and Eve around 10 to 30 thousand years ago, but perhaps as late as 60,000 years ago.

Experts in Old Testament genealogy note there is wide-spread consensus regarding dates and chronology from the time of Abraham.

The cornerstone of belief in a 6,000-year-old earth rests solely on the genealogies providing a totally accurate and complete chronology. In the late 19 centuries, Professor William Henry Green and theologian Benjamin B. It is founded upon the supposition that the genealogies of Scripture are intended to be complete, but a careful study of these genealogies clearly shows they are not intended to be complete, that they oftentimes contain only some outstanding names.” There are gaps in the genealogies.

Warfield noted gaps and omissions in the Genesis genealogies. Wayne Grudem writes, “…closer inspection of the parallel lists of names in Scripture will show that Scripture itself indicates the fact that the genealogies list only those names the biblical writers thought it important to record for their purposes.

As straightforward as this seems, related Bible passages suggest that several generations were likely skipped between Amram and Moses.